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Current Exhibit

DarwinLoominations - TWiNE 2017 will run from February 3 through April 8, 2017 at Emporium Framing & Gallery in South Berwick, Maine. This TWiNE (Tapestry Weavers in New England) exhibit features 34 tapestries by 12 tapestry artist:Lou Abbott, Priscilla May Alden, Janet Austin, Barbara Burns, Ann LeRoyer, Beth, Minear, Minna Rothman, Linda Rhynard, Sue Pretty, Tamar Shadur, Micala Sidore, Betsy Wing.

TWiNE was formed in 1991 to support contemporary tapestry artists, and to preserve and promote the ancient art of tapestry.

Barbara Burns states: "The medium of tapestry weaving allows me to create images and cloth at the same time. The tactile experience of working with fiber, along with the depth of color and richness of the woven surface excites and drives me. I find the process of creating cloth and image satisfying as it ties me to my past and my Grandmother who taught me to sew at an early age. She instilled in me, a love of creating with my hands and an appreciation for good cloth. The medium of tapestry weaving allows me to create images and cloth at the same time. The tactile experience of working with fiber, along with the depth of color and richness of the woven surface excites and drives me. I find the process of creating cloth and image satisfying as it ties me to my past and my Grandmother who taught me to sew at an early age. She instilled in me, a love of creating with my hands and an appreciation for good cloth."

My work has evolved from mostly faces to figures and parts of figures.  Lately, I have been working using photographs I have taken. Once I have created a composition that works for me I begin choosing colors, an important element to my work and my favorite part of the design process. Next, I choose the size by projecting the finalized image on a wall, moving the projector back and forth.

Tree PieceJanet Austin states:  "Nature has its language. I go for a walk, and I see: crevices, nooks, crannies, the deepest hollows in the woods, the shadow under a branch, the curve of an elbow or knee.

My inspiration derives from the visual. I allow nature to process itself through my eyes without the conscious interference of my brain, facilitating the effects of serendipity. I avoid control, seeking spontaneity in my reaction to visual stimuli.

 My tapestries grow out of my drawings and paintings; sometimes they have to sit around for years before they ripen into material for my tapestry designs. I make copies, then use a cardboard viewer to identify and cut out pieces that look like tapestries. Sometimes there is another round of drawing, tracing, photocopying. At the end there is pondering and ruminating.

Why weave tapestry? I have tried to quit, but the repetition makes it addictive. The endless rhythm of under, over, under, over is like a song stuck in my head; the only way to stop it is to sing out loud. Tapestry brings order to my life. The medium guides me along a path, and keeps me from flying off in all directions"

DreamMinna Rotman states "Creation of a tapestry, for me, always brings excitement and exploration. I do not come from a tradition of weavers (although my grandmother was an accomplished kilim weaver) nor do I have a formal education in art. Still, upon my retirement I submerged myself full time into tapestry weaving.

In designing a tapestry, I use skills obtained through my formal education in science and liberal arts. Most of my life I spent designing climate models. The atmosphere is studied by a keen observation of the environment and described by the laws of physics. The enormous amount of data obtained this way can be understood only visually. It is the visualization of scientific data that trained my eye over decades, while I was acquiring skills through  studies of art.

I follow the same steps when designing a tapestry. I observe the environment keenly and draw a picture trying to understand the underlying relationships of the composition and content that left an impression on me. This is often a long study of space, color, light and perception until the final “aha” moment. With weaving, the image becomes alive. Interaction of fiber and light lifts up the vivacity of color that often surpasses other painting media. Making a tapestry in itself is a source of great joy."

Minna Rothman [Marina Živković-Rothman], was born in Belgrade, former Yugoslavia. She has been residing in the United States since 1979 and lives with her husband and their two cats in Brookline, Massachusetts. She is a grandmother of three.

Melodic Journey 2Betsy Wing states "After spending many years as a professional musician and then as a music teacher, I transitioned to a life of weaving. My interest at first was weaving clothing and accessories which I sold at craft shows around New England Eventually I began to think of a slower pace of life. Thus began my life as a tapestry weaver.

I enrolled on tapestry and dyeing classes in Santa Fe, New Mexico and became captivated with the slow meditative process on the loom and the seemingly endless variations of color I could achieve in the depot. My colors have been influenced by the the landscapes of the Southwest , and music is always in the background when I am designing my work. Through abstract design and color gradations I try to achieve an overall feeling of peace and beauty."

Darwin (top right), Barbara Burns, Woven tapestry

Tree Piece (upper middle right), Janet Austin, Woven tapestry

Dream (lower middle right) , Minna Rothman, Woven tapestry

Melodic Journey II (lower right), Betsy Wing, Woven tapestry

 

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